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  • Writer's pictureDillan Taylor

Strengths or weaknesses?

A strong man working out in a Superman tank top

An older picture of me.

I’ve heard people say it’s vital to improve one’s weaknesses. I’ve also heard people argue we must instead build up our strengths.

I disagree with the notion that it must be one or the other. We can do both. Here’s how.

1) The Feedback exercise

This is a sobering and healthy activity to do with the people who know us best—friends, family, and trusted colleagues.

We ask them:

“Hey! I’m doing a research project and was wondering if you could help me out.

What do you think my biggest strengths are? My biggest weaknesses or blind spots?

What can I improve? What can I do more or less of?

What should I prioritize?

Let’s set up a call to go over all this if you’re down!”

This accomplishes several things. It…

• helps one see the lens with which others see them • points out things a person isn’t aware of—the good and the bad • provides a solid picture of one’s strengths to exploit and weaknesses to work on

2) Build on strengths

With a list of strengths, we can simply ask:

How can I use these on a more consistent basis?

How can I do what I’m really good at all the time?

3) Fill in the gaps

Here’s a lovely practice from the book Ultralearning:

Keep a running list of each weak spot for what we do. Examples for me include: chess, fitness, coaching, business management.

With my list of weak points (e.g. finding checkmates in chess, extra belly fat, inviting people to sessions) I now know what to practice so I can become more comfortable with them.

TL; DR

We can use our strengths more and work on our weaknesses.

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